Integrating DetectX Swift with Munki

If you like DetectX Swift and want to integrate it with Munki, this is how I did it. Hat tip to Zack McCauley for doing the heavy lifting, which I'm now building on. I'd recommend you read his blog post first.

So instead of having an Outset script or separate Launch Agent, I decided to put the DetectX Swift scan as part of the Munki run (specifically a script in the preflight.d directory that MunkiReport creates):

#!/bin/bash

# Run a DetectX Swift scan
/Applications/Utilities/DetectX\ Swift.app/Contents/MacOS/DetectX\ Swift search -aj /usr/local/munki/preflight.d/cache/detectx.json

Outside of MunkiReport (but connecting to the MunkiReport MySQL database), I have a script that generates a Python list of files that DetectX Swift has flagged as "issues":

$query="SELECT issues FROM detectx WHERE numberofissues > 0";
$result=mysqli_query($YOURDATABASECONNECTION, $query);
if(mysqli_num_rows($result)>0){
   // Create an array to store the results
   $larger_issues=array();
   while($row=mysqli_fetch_assoc($result)){
      
      // Create an array based on a semi-colon delimiter
      $smaller_issues=explode(";", $row['issues']);
      foreach($smaller_issues AS $smaller_issue){
          if((trim($smaller_issue)!='') AND (!in_array($smaller_issue, $larger_issues))){
            array_push($larger_issues, $smaller_issue);
         }
      }

   // End fetching results
   }

   if(!empty($larger_issues)){
      echo '<p>okay_to_delete = [ ';
      $counter=0;
      while($counter+1<count($larger_issues)){
         echo '\'' . $larger_issues[$counter] . '\',<br />';   
         $counter+=1;
      }
      echo '\'' . $larger_issues[$counter] . '\' ]</p>';
      //print_r($larger_issues);
   
   // End checking there are elements in larger issues (there should be)
   }

// End checking there are any issues
}

And finally I have a nopkg to do the actual cleaning of the issues DetectX flagged.

So why even have an array of okay-to-delete things?

Well, DetectX Swift has command-line options to scan, but it (at least as of this writing) does not have the option to command-line remove things, presumably so someone has a chance to review the things removed before actually removing them. Also, since it's just forcefully removing things (yes, I know about using shutil to remove, but I've run into weird situations in which that doesn't work consistently, so I'm using a subprocess to invoke rm instead), it's probably a good idea for at least one human to review things before they get removed.

The nopkg also copies the .json to /var/log (with a datetime stamp in the name) before removing anything.

askForPassword and askForPasswordDelay in macOS 10.13 (High Sierra)

Update: Apparently 10.13.4 just breaks this completely (defaults write commands won't do anything any more). Thanks to tristan on the MacAdmins Slack for pointing this out.

In macOS 10.12 (Sierra) and earlier, you could go to System Preferences > Security & Privacy > General > Require password ________ after sleep or screen saver begins, and that would populate the askForPassword and askForPasswordDelay keys in ~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.screensaver.plist for the user.

In macOS 10.13 (High Sierra), setting that preference in the GUI will not make it appear in the relevant .plist file. However, setting the preference with

defaults write com.apple.screensaver askForPassword -bool TRUE
defaults write com.apple.screensaver askForPasswordDelay -int somenumber
will make the change reflect in the GUI, and setting a .mobileconfig profile will also override what's set in the GUI.

Oddly enough, Apple's own documentation makes it sound as if those two keys exist only in 10.13 and later:

Use the command-line to set a firmware password on macOS

For extra security, you can add a firmware password to Macs, especially since Find My Mac is essentially useless (unlike for iPads, which have an activation lock preventing thieves from reactivating the iPad after a factory reset) and DEP-to-MDM enrollments for Macs can even be avoided by thieves if they're resourceful enough.

If you have a laptop with a firmware password, you need that password to boot from anything except the startup disk. Combine that with FileVault encryption, and a stolen Mac is pretty much useless. Doesn't mean that you'll necessarily get it back, but the likelihood is higher if the device is useless to thieves.

You can, of course, enable the firmware password via Recovery Mode, but it's easier to do it from the command line:

sudo firmwarepasswd -setpasswd
You'll be prompted for the new firmware password. Afterwards, you'll need to reboot the machine for the change to take effect. (Be sure to make sure you have an actual startup disk selected in System Preferences!)

There are two modes for a firmware password: command and full. By default, the firmware password mode will be command, which means you'll be prompted for the password only if you boot from something other than the startup disk. If, for some strange reason, you want the mode to be full, it would mean you'd be prompted for a firmware password at every boot, regardless of what you're booting to.

A few other commands you might find useful...

sudo firmwarepasswd -check
checks to see if the firmware password is set.
sudo firmwarepasswd -verify
allows you to verify you have the correct password (without rebooting).
sudo firmwarepasswd -delete
deletes the firmware password. You'll need the current one to delete it, of course.

If you want to script firmware password setting, someone wrote a fairly simple script that does it. There's also firmware password manager, which is a far more sophisticated way to manage firmware passwords.

Nota Bene: If you enable a firmware password, you can get into target disk mode by holding down the Alt/Option key at boot, typing in the firmware password, and then holding down the T key. However, you will be unable to boot into Safe Mode unless you delete the firmware password.